Currie, Cameron

Evolution of host-microbe interactions, including both pathogenic and beneficial microbes. We are particularly interested in: i) the evolution of virulence, ii) determining the factors that shape host-microbe specificity, iii) exploring factors limiting and/or facilitating broad host jumps, iv) and host-microbe coevolutionary dynamics. Our main model system is the fungus-growing ant–microbe symbiosis.

Deming, Dustin

I am a gastrointestinal oncologist at the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center (UWCCC) and the William S Middleton Veterans Hospital. I have a subspecialty focus in the treatment of colon, rectal and anal cancers. My research aims to fundamentally change the way in which we treat gastrointestinal cancers to a more personalized approach.

Denlinger, Loren

Host-pathogen interactions; the role of macrophages in immunity to intracellular pathogens; innate immune responses like cytokine production & microbial killing amplified by extracellular nucleotide receptor known as P2X7 (significant functional diversity for this receptor exists between cell types & human subjects); role of P2X7 as candidate gene modulating the human innate immune responses of macrophages & airway epithelial cells to Chlamydia pneumoniae, contribution of responses of asthma

Djamali, Arjang

The cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrogenesis in native and transplant kidney disease

Engin, Feyza

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from the destruction of the insulin-secreting b-cells by an immune mediated process. The increasing incidence of type 1 diabetes around the word, especially among children, has been of great concern.

Evans, David

Understanding host-pathogen interactions for human and simian immunodeficiency viruses

Fabry, Zsuzsanna

Mechanisms of neuroinflammation in autoimmunity, infection or traumas of the Central Nervous System.

Fan, Jing

Mammalian cellular metabolism is a dynamic process that consists of thousands of interconnected reactions and regulatory interactions. While the architecture of metabolic networks is defined by the genome, actual metabolic activity (i.e. metabolic flux) through the pathways varies greatly. Dynamic reprogramming of metabolism enables cells to meet metabolic needs associated with specific cellular states and cellular functions (such as supporting proliferation or activating immune function), and adapt to changes in the environment. The overarching goal of our research is to understand how mammalian cellular metabolism is reprogrammed in response to changes in the environment and cellular state, and how activities in key metabolic pathways can in turn affect cell function. To study this, we combine systems biology approaches, especially fluxomics and metabolomics, with computational modeling and biochemical and genetic techniques.