Miriam Shelef, MD, PhD

Portrait of Miriam Shelef, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor
Medicine
Address: 
4130 MFCB
1685 Highland Ave
Madison, WI 53792
Telephone: 
(608) 263-5241
Focus Groups: 
Immunology/Immunopathology
Education: 
MD, Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons
PhD, Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons
Residency/Fellowship, University of Wisconsin - Madison
Research Summary: 
Rheumatoid arthritis, peptidylarginine deiminases, autoimmunity, inflammation, autoantibodies, neutrophils and other immune cells.
Research Detail: 

Dr. Miriam Shelef is a rheumatologist and an immunologist who heads a laboratory focused on understanding the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis with the long-term goal of developing novel biomarkers and therapeutics. Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune, inflammatory, and destructive arthritis that affects 1% of the population and is often resistant to treatment.  Two citrullinating enzymes, PAD2 and PAD4, are thought to be important for immune cell function as well as the generation of the citrullinated antigens that are targeted by pathologic autoantibodies. One of the main areas of focus for Dr. Shelef’s laboratory is shedding light on the role of PAD2 and PAD4 in the development of rheumatoid arthritis. Dr. Shelef also studies how synovial fibroblasts, cells that line the joint and destroy cartilage and bone in rheumatoid arthritis, contribute to arthritis pathogenesis. Dr. Shelef’s research is funded by the Rheumatology Research Foundation and the NIH.

Selected Publications: 
Shelef MA, Bennin DA, Yasmin N, Warner TF, Huttenlocher A. Activated FAK is required for synovial fibroblast migration, but not focal matrix degradation or arthritis. Submitted. Arthritis Research and Therapy.
Shelef MA, Sokolove J, Lahey LJ, Wagner CA, Sackmann EK, Warner TF, Beebe DJ, Robinson WH, Huttenlocher A. Peptidyl arginine deiminase 4 modulates tumor necrosis factor alpha induced anti-citrullinated protein antibodies and arthritis. 2014. Arthritis and Rheumatology.
Shelef MA, Tauzin S, Huttenlocher A. Neutrophil migration; moving from zebrafish models to human autoimmunity. Immunol Rev. 2013 Nov;256(1):269-81
Sackmann EK, Berthier E, Young EW, Shelef MA, Wernimont SA, Huttenlocher A, Beebe DJ. Microfluidic kit-on-a-lid: a versatile platform for neutrophil chemotaxis assays. Blood. 2012 Oct 4;120(14):e45-53.
Sackmann EK, Berthier E, Young EW, Shelef MA, Wernimont SA, Huttenlocher A, Beebe DJ. Microfluidic kit-on-a-lid: a versatile platform for neutrophil chemotaxis assays. Blood. 2012 Oct 4;120(14):e45-53.
Shelef MA, Bennin DA, Mosher DF, Huttenlocher A, Citrullination of Fibronectin Modulates Synovial Fibroblast Behavior. Arthritis Res Ther. 2012 Nov 5;14(6):R240.
Shapiro-Shelef M, Calame K. Regulation of plasma-cell development. Nat Rev Immunol. 2005 Mar;5(3):230.
Shelef MA, Bennin DA, Yasmin N, Warner TF, Huttenlocher A. Activated FAK is required for synovial fibroblast migration, but not focal matrix degradation or arthritis. Submitted. Arthritis Research and Therapy.
Shapiro-Shelef M, Lin K-I, Savitsky D, Liao J, and Calame K, Blimp-1 is required for maintenance of long-lived plasma cells in the bone marrow. J Exp Med. 2005 Dec 5;202(11):1471-6.
Shapiro-Shelef M and Calame K. Plasma cell differentiation and multiple myeloma. Curr Opin Immunol. 2004 Apr;16(2):226.
Shaffer AL, Shapiro-Shelef M, Iwakoshi NN, Lee AH, Qian SB, Zhao H, Yu X, Yang L, Tan BK, Rosenwald A, Hurt EM, Petroulakis E, Sonenberg N, Yewdell JW, Calame K, Glimcher LH, Staudt LM. XBP1, downstream of Blimp-1, expands the secretory apparatus and other organelles, and increases protein synthesis in plasma cell differentiation. Immunity. 2004 Jul;21(1):81.
Shapiro-Shelef M, Lin KI, McHeyzer-Williams LJ, Liao J, McHeyzer-Williams MG, Calame K. Blimp-1 is required for the formation of immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells and pre-plasma memory B cells. Immunity. 2003 Oct;19(4):607.
Hahn ME, Karchner SI, Shapiro MA, Perera SA. Molecular evolution of two vertebrate aryl hydrocarbon (dioxin) receptors (AHR1 and AHR2) and the PAS family. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1997 Dec 9;94(25):13743.