Jenny Gumperz, PhD

Portrait of Jenny Gumperz, PhD
Associate Professor
Medical Microbiology and Immunology
Address: 
4305 MSB
1550 Linden Drive
Madison, WI 53706
Telephone: 
(608) 263-6902
Focus Groups: 
Cancer Biology
Immunology/Immunopathology
Education: 
PhD, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
Research Summary: 
The Gumperz lab studies human innate T lymphocytes, with a particular focus on a subset called Natural Killer T (NKT) cells. NKT cells are able to affect the functions of many other types of immune cells, and in so doing they can markedly influence the outcome of immune responses. Because of this, and because they are activated by conserved antigens, NKT cells are of interest as a human lymphocyte population that could be harnessed clinically for immunotherapeutic strategies. What interests us about NKT cells is that they can become activated by self lipids, which means that they can perform functions even when there is no infectious challenge, and they can amplify immune responses without requiring the presence of a specific foreign antigen. One of the central questions my lab is addressing is to understand how this autoreactivity contributes to inflammatory responses and immune regulation. We are investigating these questions at the molecular and cellular levels, and also in the context of larger immunological processes such as graft-vs-host disease that occurs after transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells, and immune responses during Epstein-Barr virus infection.
Research Detail: 

Please see Gumperz Lab

Selected Publications: 
López-Sagaseta J, Sibener LV, Kung JE, Gumperz J, Adams EJ (2012) Lysophospholipid presentation by CD1d and recognition by a human Natural Killer T-cell receptor. EMBO J. 31(8):2047-59
Wang X, Bishop KA, Hegde S, Rodenkirch LA, Pike JW, Gumperz JE (2012) Human invariant natural killer T cells acquire transient innate responsiveness via histone H4 acetylation induced by weak TCR stimulation. J. Exp. Med. 209(5):987-1000
Ma SD, Yu X, Mertz JE, Gumperz JE, Reinheim E, Zhou Y, Tang W, Burlingham WJ, Gulley ML, Kenney SC (2012) An Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) mutant with enhanced BZLF1 expression causes lymphomas with abortive lytic EBV infection in a humanized mouse model. J. Virol. 86(15):7976-87
Ma SD, Hegde S, Young KH, Sullivan R, Rajesh D, Zhou Y, Jankowska-Gan E, Burlingham WJ, Sun X, Gulley ML, Tang W, Gumperz JE, Kenney SC (2011) A new model of Epstein-Barr virus infection reveals an important role for early lytic viral protein expression in the development of lymphomas. J. Virol. 85(1):165-77
Hegde S, Lockridge JL, Becker YA, Ma S, Kenney SC, Gumperz JE (2011) Human NKT cells direct the differentiation of myeloid APCs that regulate T cell responses via expression of programmed cell death ligands. J. Autoimmun. 37(1):28-38
Lockridge JL, Chen X, Zhou Y, Rajesh D, Roenneburg DA, Hegde S, Gerdts S, Cheng TY, Anderson RJ, Painter GF, Moody DB, Burlingham WJ, Gumperz JE (2011) Analysis of the CD1 antigen presenting system in humanized SCID mice. PLoS ONE 6(6):e21701
Wiemer AJ, Hegde S, Gumperz JE, Huttenlocher A (2011) A live imaging cell motility screen identifies prostaglandin E2 as a T cell stop signal antagonist. J. Immunol. 187(7):3663-70
Zeissig S, Dougan SK, Barral DC, Junker Y, Chen Z, Kaser A, Ho M, Mandel H, McIntyre A, Kennedy SM, Painter GF, Veerapen N, Besra GS, Cerundolo V, Yue S, Beladi S, Behar SM, Chen X, Gumperz JE, Breckpot K, Raper A, Baer A, Exley MA, Hegele RA, Cuchel M, Rader DJ, Davidson NO, Blumberg RS (2010) Primary deficiency of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein in human abetalipoproteinemia is associated with loss of CD1 function. J. Clin. Invest. 120(8):2889-99
Fox L, Hegde S, Gumperz JE (2010) Natural killer T cells: innate lymphocytes positioned as a bridge between acute and chronic inflammation? Microbes Infect. 12(14-15):1125-33
Scharf L, Li NS, Hawk AJ, Garzón D, Zhang T, Fox LM, Kazen AR, Shah S, Haddadian EJ, Gumperz JE, Saghatelian A, Faraldo-Gómez JD, Meredith SC, Piccirilli JA, Adams EJ (2010) The 2.5 å structure of CD1c in complex with a mycobacterial lipid reveals an open groove ideally suited for diverse antigen presentation. Immunity 33(6):853-62